Josephine Herrick Project
Formerly RTP (Rehabilitation Through Photography)

The Josephine Herrick Project is a nonprofit that enlists photographic community volunteers to educate students who have not had the opportunity to learn the communicative power of photography. Through partnerships with local organizations, JHProject’s completely free programs inspire children, teens, adults and seniors with the visual language of photography, enhancing their abilities to transform communities through artistic vision.

Learning Digital Photography to Keep Your Brain Sharp

©Photo UT Dallas

By Jackie Augustine – July 29, 2014

Learning digtial photography is an excellent way to keep your brain sharp. The process of learning how a new digital camera works involves time, patience and enthusiasm. We are very excited to be beginning a new program next week with The Education Alliance Sirovich Center for older adults.  Our volunteer photographers will start by introducing the basic steps of using a digital camera.  In subsequent weeks, the “senior students” will be given a variety of projects to perfect their skills and enjoy the amazing results!  Yesterday I read an article by Lauren Silverman of NPR about the amazing power of photography to prevent brain loss in seniors.  I wanted to share with you some of the findings from that article.

by Lauren Silverman – NPR.org

Brain training is big business, with computerized brain games touted as a way to help prevent memory loss. But new research shows you might be better off picking up a challenging new hobby.

To test this theory, Dr. Denise Park, a neuroscientist at the University of Texas at Dallas, randomly assigned 200 older people to different activities. Some learned digital photography. Another group took up quilting.

The greatest improvement was for the people who learned digital photography and Photoshop — perhaps, Park says, because it was the most difficult.

Jimmy Wilson, 82, agreed to learn to use a computer, a camera and Photoshop for the trial. “That was really quite a challenge for me when I got into the photo class,” Wilson says, “because it involved a computer and I had never even touched a computer.”

Wilson is motivated to fight dementia, in part because he saw what the disease did to his wife toward the end of her life.

“When my wife died,” he says, “it would have been real easy to just become a total recluse.” Instead, Wilson embraced being socially and mentally active. He’s a member of the choir at his church, and when he’s not reading current events and books on his Kindle, he gets together with family for Mexican food.

Since Wilson participated in the trial, he says, he has noticed improvement in his memory, although he says it still isn’t perfect. He admits it can be frustrating learning to use new technology, but he knows it’s good for his brain.

So how does learning a new skill help ward off dementia? By strengthening the connections between parts of your brain, says cognitive psychologist Scott Barry Kaufman. While brain games improve a limited aspect of short-term memory, Kaufman says, challenging activities strengthen entire networks in the brain.

“It really is strengthening the connectivity between these team players of these large-scale brain networks,” he says.

Read more:  http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2014/05/05/309006780/learning-a-new-skill-works-best-to-keep-your-brain-sharp

About The Educational Alliance

The Educational Alliance is a community-based non-profit organization that provides services to 50,000 New Yorkers annually through dozens of programs at 16 locations in lower Manhattan. We are a Jewish-founded organization, serving people of diverse ethnic, religious, and socio-economic backgrounds.  Since its founding in 1889, the Educational Alliance has helped more than 4,000,000 New Yorkers build better lives through education, arts, recreation, and social services.Our Program

About the Sirovich Center

Older adults from the five boroughs travel to Sirovich for the its warm atmosphere and vibrant community.  In addition to the variety of programs and events, Sirovich also provides a hot lunch five days per week. At Sirovich, everyone is part of a big family. There’s always someone to turn to for a shoulder to lean on or a smile to brighten the day!

 

 

Volunteer Photographers Needed!

JHP is now interviewing volunteer photographers
to teach free programs to underserved communities
in NYC area. Send letter & resume to maureen@jhproject.org

Volunteer Photography Instructors

Our photographers are an active group of volunteers that donate their time and expertise to our diverse populations in New York area. JHP is looking for experienced photographers that are comfortable teaching the basics of digital photography from a basic academic level to a more advanced level, but that also have patience and flexibility to fit the needs of a sometimes mixed group of individuals with different levels of learning abilities and interest.

For more information about the duties of volunteer photographers visit: http://jhproject.org/about/our-photographers/volunteer-photographers-needed/

 

Own Jack Reznicki’s Famous Number Series #1 on the new JHP Professional Photographers Gallery Today!

 By Jack Reznicki

Number Series 1 – By Lauren Kupferberg – July 23, 2014

As you view this photographic collage you see numbers from 1 to 50. The mystery behind where these individual numbers come from forces the viewer to look closely at every detail of the photograph finding hints in the background. Even though each number is from a different place, ranging from a mailbox to a house number to a table card, the image comes together. The numbers blend into one photo, the darks of one image is lightened by the image next to it. The numbers pop out in random places, forcing the viewer’s eye to move all around the image, rather than stay on one particular place.  The photograph is the combination of many singular photos that has morphed into one singular photograph.

 

 “Numbers Series 1”
Archival inkjet on cold press bright paper
Value $1,000
Size: 17 x 22

Dimensions:  

10 X 14 in (25.4 X 35.56 cm)

Medium:  

archival pigment print

Creation Date:  

2010

Signed

 

About the Photographer

Jack Reznicki is an Israeli, born to a Holocaust survivor. He moved to America at four and grew up in Rochester, NY. He went to Rochester Institute of technology (RIT). In 1980 he opened his own studio after working with many amazing photographers.  He is very insightful on the psychology of photography.  He has authored books, and teaches classes about the business of photography. He has helped promote many brands, such as AT&T, Toys “R” Us, Kodak and others.  He was been honored to win many awards, including winning the IPC twice. Reznicki does not just promote photography from his classroom, he has traveled all over the world trying to capture culture of people.

 

Own an Amazing Photo and Support an Amazing Cause!

We are excited to announce the launch of the Josephine Herrick Project Professional Photographers Online Gallery.  Our gallery was launched with 12 amazing photographs generously donated by 12 amazing professional photographers who are supporters of the Josephine Herrick Project’s mission which is “to provide completely free programs that inspire children, teens, adults and seniors with the visual language of photography, enhancing their abilities to transform communities through artistic vision.”

This is a great opportunity to own an amazing  photograph and help support our programs!

 

Please visit the Online Gallery at: